Space requirements for chicken

Space: density of birds per unit area

This is the most important basic principle in housing, as the space available determines the number and type of poultry that can be kept. For example, a deep litter house measuring 6 m by 11 m can hold 200 laying hens at a stock density of 3 birds/m2 .

Hen groups are comfortable at a stock density of three to four birds per square meter. If more space is allowed, a greater variety of behavior can be expressed. Less space creates stressed social behavior, allowing disease vulnerability and cannibalism and leaving weaker birds deprived of feed or perch space. Individual birds need more room for normal behavior and adequate exercise than the 22 birds/m2 density currently used in commercial laying cages.

Space requirements for laying hens, according to weight

Age (weeks) Maximum body weight (g) Minimum cage floor space(cm2)
0-6 400 150
6-12 950 270
12-18 1320 335
Adult1 1700 1700 432
Adult2 1900 1900 483

1typical white-egg layer

2typical brown-egg layer

Free-run, indoor systems for commercial layers:

Floor space requirements for free-run, indoor systems vary considerably depending on breed, ambient temperature and whether any or the entire floor consists of wire or wooden slats. In general, the most space is required in systems with 100% litter floors, and the least where the floor is entirely wire or slats. Producers should interpolate between the extremes in the following table based on individual circumstances.

Space requirements for free-run, indoor systems for commercial layers

Age (weeks) Maximum body weight (g) Minimum floor space (cm2)
All litter All wire/slats
0-6 400 500 250
6-18/19 1320 1400 700
Adult1 1700 1700 850
Adult2 1900 1900 950

1typical white-egg layer

2typical brown-egg layer

Broilers

Broilers and replacement pullets should be raised at one bird per sq ft (0.09 sq m) while leghorn layers over 20 weeks of age should be housed at 1.5 sq ft (0.14 sq m) per bird and medium size layers at 1.75 sq ft (0.16 sq m).

Requirement of chickens for floor and perch space

Linear space or length of perch per bird is measured in centimeters. The recommended floor and perching space for the three main types of chicken is shown in below

Chicken type Floor space (birds/m2) Perch Space (per bird)
Layer 3 25
Dual purpose 4 20
Meat 4-5 15-20

Hen groups are comfortable at a stock density of three to four birds per square meter. If more space is allowed, a greater variety of behavior can be expressed. Less space creates stressed social behavior, allowing disease vulnerability and cannibalism and leaving weaker birds deprived of feed or perch space. Individual birds need more room for normal behavior and adequate exercise than the 22 birds/m2 density currently used in commercial laying cages.

Nests

To avoid excessive competition and minimize eggs laid on the floor, one nest should be provided for every five hens. If larger communal nests are used, at least one square meter per 50 birds should be allowed. Nest boxes for individual hens should measure approximately 30 cm on all sides, with a nest floor area of about 0.1 m2 .

Feed and feeder space requirements for 100 chickens

Age (weeks) Feeder space (m)
1-4 2.5
4-6 3.8
6-9 6.1
10-14 9.6
15 and above 12.7

Minimum water and watering space requirements for 100 birds in hot dry conditions

Age (weeks) Water space (m)
0-1 0.7
2-4 1
4-9 1.5
9 or more 2.0
Layer 2.5

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Comments   

 
Nomonde Gebashe
+3 # Nomonde Gebashe 2015-05-27 22:49
How many square meters can accommodate 500 chickens!
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philan
+1 # philan 2016-05-26 10:26
168 square metre will comfortably accommodate 500 layers.
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Timmy
-2 # Timmy 2016-07-03 20:49
How many square meters can accommodate 100 layers?
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deal on the web
0 # deal on the web 2017-03-10 10:16
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